The spinning wheel and me

Julia-Seeker-mon-petit-rouet
photo: Daniel Berkmann

I was born and grew up in the south of Germany, where I worked for a few years in an office after finishing my marketing studies.
But at some point I realized that I wanted to change my life.

After some holidays in the southwest of France – the Béarn – it soon became clear that I wanted to live there. The Béarn is a beautiful, rural region in Aquitaine, bordering the Basque Country.
I think it was the sheep of my neighbours that finally inspired me to work on the spinning wheel.

Soon, the idea was born to sell self-spun yarns at local markets and to offer them on a small online shop.

Since there are a lot of sheep in our region, I was able to gain my first experiences with “freshly shorn” woolen fleeces. Sorting, washing, carding, spinning – what a beautiful work. My enthusiasm for this natural product increased everytime I worked on it!

I have decided that I mainly want to work with wool from animals that live in France.
I have found small family businesses here they respect their animals, love them and offer them a species-appropriate life.

The work on the spinning wheel is very relaxing. The large wheel is turned by pedals and the hands feed small amounts of fibres in the direction of the turning spindle, where the twisted yarn winds up.
The working speed is determined by the hands and feet.
This coordination takes some practice, but then it is satisfying to feel the yarn winding up meter by meter and you realize that you can create a wonderful product out of some loose fibres – in complete tranquility and without electricity.

photo: Daniel Berkmann
Logo mon petit rouet
photo: Daniel Berkmann

All the yarns of mon petit rouet are handspun!

photo: Daniel Berkmann

All the steps – from the shearing of the sheep to the preparation of the wool, the production of the yarn up to the knitting of a pullover – are possible without the use of electricity.

That’s what I like about spinning: the return to an old tradition, the tranquility of handicraft, the total independence of plugs and the satisfaction that comes over me when I’ve made something by hand.

With mon petit rouet I try to make a contribution to the preservation of an old craft as well as to a respectful handling of our environment and the precious, natural raw materials.
I buy the animal wool fibers mainly from small French companies. On the one hand to keep the transport short, on the other to discover and share the local variety of sheep breeds and other animal wool suppliers.

Have fun with the creations of mon petit rouet!

Yours,
Julia Seeker